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What is Resilience?

Banner - What is resilience?

Resilience is the capacity to recover quickly. To be a resilient person is to bounce back and adapt to hardships. Essentially, resilience is the quality that allows someone to be pushed down by circumstance or events and allows that person to come back stronger than ever!

Resilience is universal and inherent to all people. Resilience translates to all cultures and languages. For example, La Resistencia, in Spanish. Resiliencia, in French. 弹性 (Tanxing), in Chinese. लचीलाता (Lacheelaata), in Hindi. Elastizitat, in German. Sprezyztosc, in Polish. 反発力 (Rejiriensu), in Japanese. Elastičnost, in Croation.

Why is Being Resilient so Important?

Resilience leads to improved relationships, academic success, increased physical and mental health, reduces risk-taking behaviors (such as excessive drinking or drugs), job performance, and strengthens your capacity to problem-solve and manage anxiety and stressful situations.

Why is Resilience important to youth?

Resilience prepares our youth to tackle obstacles, adversity and overcome challenges as they continue to grow and learn. Resilience works to support youth, adolescents and young adults to build positive relationships, show acceptance, encourage independent thought, to know when to ask for help, and how to utilize resources. Resilience helps youth do better in school, reduces risky behaviors, and builds on strengths so they do not give up on themselves.

What does it mean to demonstrate Resilience?

To demonstrate Resilience is to identify your individual strengths and abilities in developing a plan with specific steps to move to higher levels of Resilience.

Self-directed Resilience is to be aware of the opportunities and resources through a concentrated effort. It results in being focused on the resources for self-development and most importantly, the courage to take advantage of them.

What does Resilience look like?

    1. Ability to regulate stress and anxiety
    2. Ability to reach out and obtain services and support (housing, food, etc.)
    3. Positive Mental Health and Self-Esteem
    4. Optimism and sense of self
    5. Self-sufficient
    6. Independence, not being controlled by environment or dysfunction
    7. Life Balance (Education, family, social, and employment)
    8. Adaptability
    9. Good health habits (sleep, exercise, nutrition).
    10. Ability to manage thoughts, emotions and behavior in positively
    11. Strong coping skills, with enhanced problem solving.
    12. Embrace nurturing strategies through positive selfcare.

How does Resilience Start?

Resilience starts with identifying your strengths and allowing yourself to recognize that additional resources would be helpful.

    1. Emotions are normal, allow yourself to feel them.
    2. Identify your support system and allow the Nevada Resilience Project to be part of that system.
    3. Be mindful about self-care.
    4. Be mindful about health care (sleep, nutrition).
    5. Maintain routines, if possible.
    6. Focus on positives, where-ever they can be found.

Putting Resilience into Action!

Stay Healthy

  • Take time to move each day, whether it be a walk or gentle stretches.
  • Eat healthy, including fruits and vegetables, when possible.
  • Ensure you are getting enough sleep.
  • Turn off technology and allow your mind to wander. Maybe sit on the patio for a few minutes of each day.
  • Set boundaries with news, social media and/or television content.

For Youth and Children

  • Provide structure with a daily schedule for meals, studying and playing.
  • Share feelings openly.
  • Find ways to spend quality time together, such as making dinner together.
  • Engage with writing letters or drawing pictures for others (senior homes, family members).
  • Foster creativity and make time for imaginary plan.
  • Allow children to help with chores and household duties – give them a sense of purpose.

For Teens

  • Allow your teen to share how they are feeling (frustrations, anxiety) and listen. Listening does not mean you have to find solutions, but they need to know they are being heard.
  • Encourage them to reach out to friends and stay connected.
  • Engage your teens in developing relaxation techniques, make it a family event.
  • Exercise or take walks whenever possible.
  • Encourage your teen to develop future goals and dreams.

For Seniors

  • Stay connected with loved ones through letters or on-line.
  • Limit news consumption to lower anxiety.
  • Practice mindfulness techniques such as deep breathing, a warm bath or sitting with a pet.
  • Move your body, walk around, do a puzzle, read a book, stretch to help calm tension.
  • Find ways to laugh.

For Everyone

  • Maintain a daily routine
  • Take breaks to set aside time that is not focused on deadlines, current events, or mandatory activities.
  • Learn about self-care, including eating healthy, exercising, getting a good amount of sleep, and having time to relax.
  • Focus on positive events.
  • Look for opportunities for self-discovery.
  • Identify if you need additional support and reach out to a Resilience Ambassador to provide you with ideas and support your strengths.
  • Be flexible, change is inevitable.
  • Celebrate small successes as much as large ones.
  • Practice optimism.
  • Remember every day is part of the learning process

What is Resilience?

Banner - What is resilience?

Resilience is the capacity to recover quickly. To be a resilient person is to bounce back and adapt to hardships. Essentially, resilience is the quality that allows someone to be pushed down by circumstance or events and allows that person to come back stronger than ever!

Resilience is universal and inherent to all people. Resilience translates to all cultures and languages. For example, La Resistencia, in Spanish. Resiliencia, in French. 弹性 (Tanxing), in Chinese. लचीलाता (Lacheelaata), in Hindi. Elastizitat, in German. Sprezyztosc, in Polish. 反発力 (Rejiriensu), in Japanese. Elastičnost, in Croation.

Why is Being Resilient so Important?

Resilience leads to improved relationships, academic success, increased physical and mental health, reduces risk-taking behaviors (such as excessive drinking or drugs), job performance, and strengthens your capacity to problem-solve and manage anxiety and stressful situations.

Why is Resilience important to youth?

Resilience prepares our youth to tackle obstacles, adversity and overcome challenges as they continue to grow and learn. Resilience works to support youth, adolescents and young adults to build positive relationships, show acceptance, encourage independent thought, to know when to ask for help, and how to utilize resources. Resilience helps youth do better in school, reduces risky behaviors, and builds on strengths so they do not give up on themselves.

What does it mean to demonstrate Resilience?

To demonstrate Resilience is to identify your individual strengths and abilities in developing a plan with specific steps to move to higher levels of Resilience.

Self-directed Resilience is to be aware of the opportunities and resources through a concentrated effort. It results in being focused on the resources for self-development and most importantly, the courage to take advantage of them.

What does Resilience look like?

    1. Ability to regulate stress and anxiety
    2. Ability to reach out and obtain services and support (housing, food, etc.)
    3. Positive Mental Health and Self-Esteem
    4. Optimism and sense of self
    5. Self-sufficient
    6. Independence, not being controlled by environment or dysfunction
    7. Life Balance (Education, family, social, and employment)
    8. Adaptability
    9. Good health habits (sleep, exercise, nutrition).
    10. Ability to manage thoughts, emotions and behavior in positively
    11. Strong coping skills, with enhanced problem solving.
    12. Embrace nurturing strategies through positive selfcare.

How does Resilience Start?

Resilience starts with identifying your strengths and allowing yourself to recognize that additional resources would be helpful.

    1. Emotions are normal, allow yourself to feel them.
    2. Identify your support system and allow the Nevada Resilience Project to be part of that system.
    3. Be mindful about self-care.
    4. Be mindful about health care (sleep, nutrition).
    5. Maintain routines, if possible.
    6. Focus on positives, where-ever they can be found.

Putting Resilience into Action!

Stay Healthy

  • Take time to move each day, whether it be a walk or gentle stretches.
  • Eat healthy, including fruits and vegetables, when possible.
  • Ensure you are getting enough sleep.
  • Turn off technology and allow your mind to wander. Maybe sit on the patio for a few minutes of each day.
  • Set boundaries with news, social media and/or television content.

For Youth and Children

  • Provide structure with a daily schedule for meals, studying and playing.
  • Share feelings openly.
  • Find ways to spend quality time together, such as making dinner together.
  • Engage with writing letters or drawing pictures for others (senior homes, family members).
  • Foster creativity and make time for imaginary plan.
  • Allow children to help with chores and household duties – give them a sense of purpose.

For Teens

  • Allow your teen to share how they are feeling (frustrations, anxiety) and listen. Listening does not mean you have to find solutions, but they need to know they are being heard.
  • Encourage them to reach out to friends and stay connected.
  • Engage your teens in developing relaxation techniques, make it a family event.
  • Exercise or take walks whenever possible.
  • Encourage your teen to develop future goals and dreams.

For Seniors

  • Stay connected with loved ones through letters or on-line.
  • Limit news consumption to lower anxiety.
  • Practice mindfulness techniques such as deep breathing, a warm bath or sitting with a pet.
  • Move your body, walk around, do a puzzle, read a book, stretch to help calm tension.
  • Find ways to laugh.

For Everyone

  • Maintain a daily routine
  • Take breaks to set aside time that is not focused on deadlines, current events, or mandatory activities.
  • Learn about self-care, including eating healthy, exercising, getting a good amount of sleep, and having time to relax.
  • Focus on positive events.
  • Look for opportunities for self-discovery.
  • Identify if you need additional support and reach out to a Resilience Ambassador to provide you with ideas and support your strengths.
  • Be flexible, change is inevitable.
  • Celebrate small successes as much as large ones.
  • Practice optimism.
  • Remember every day is part of the learning process
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